Dr. Julie Beckwith, PsyD, hspp

she/her/hers

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Dr. Julie Beckwith is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist who works with adults providing individual therapy and psychological assessments. She works with a variety of issues mainly focused on relationships with self and others, trauma, disordered eating, body image (health at every size), and identity development/ exploration including gender, sexuality, race, and ethnicity. She is also committed to racial and social justice issues and advocacy work.

 

Dr. Beckwith views her clients from a holistic perspective to gain a deeper understanding by exploring past experiences and connecting these experiences in their current daily life. Dr. Beckwith believes that the power of fully knowing yourself leads to a more fulfilling life. Through therapy, clients can better understand themselves and the ways they interact with themselves and others in their life. She often contextualizes clients' unique experiences through societal lens, as well as their connections with their body. Understanding societal aspects can be  especially prominent in understanding experiences of BIPOC and LGBTQ+ individuals, as well as gender norms. In understanding a client's connection to their body, she explores their emotional experiences and notable experiences in their life. She then considers how movement such as yoga, mindfulness, and breathing can offer insight and relief. Overall, she works collaboratively with clients to identify goals and explore how they can work to achieve them.  

 

Dr. Beckwith provides psychological assessments for ADHD, ASD, Learning Disorders, Personality Disorders/ dynamics, and diagnostic clarifications.  She enjoys doing assessments to add a greater depth to individual therapeutic work with her own clients and in collaboration with other clinicians when appropriate. Dr. Beckwith also conducts Eating Disorder assessments, which can provide recommendations for treatment and insight into eating patterns.

 

In her free time, Dr. Beckwith enjoys cooking (often by making as many substitutions in recipes as possible), yoga, crafting (with mixed results), and being outside.